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Collection Samuel Magnus Hill papers
Collection Number MSS P:3
Dates of Creation 1870-1920
Extent of Description 2.5 linear feet, 6 boxes
Language Swedish, English
Creator Hill, Samuel Magnus, 1851-1921
Search Terms Hill, Samuel Magnus, 1851-1921
Hill family
Wahoo (Neb.)
Salt Lake City (Utah)
Utah
Altona (Ill.)
Illinois
Colton (Ore.)
Oregon
Missions
Mormonism
Luther College (Wahoo, Neb.)
Göteborg (Sweden)
Stockholm (Sweden)
Lund (Sweden)
Temperance
Students
Coeducation
Travel writing
Poetry
Administrative or Biographical History Samuel Magnus Hill was born in Sund, Östergötland, Sweden on January 10, 1851 to Samuel and Maria (Ottar) Samuelson.   The family emigrated to Altona, Illinois in 1868.  Shortly after arriving in the U.S. the family changed their surname to Hill. The family eventually moved to Paxton, Illinois and finally they settled in Chariton, Iowa.
Samuel enrolled at Augustana College in 1875 at the age of 24 and graduated in 1879. He worked throughout his college years to support himself and pay the tuition. His parents were poor and unable to provide any financial assistance.
After graduation, Samuel went to Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota to teach music and other subjects. Shortly, after his arrival at Gustavus, the College decided to change to co-education and in the first class of girls, he met Julie Johnson whom he married in 1882. Hill stayed at Gustavus for three years.
In 1882, Hill was called by the Illinois conference to go to Utah and serve as a missionary among the Swedes in the Mormon Church. He remained in Utah until 1884, when he accepted a teaching position at the Luther Academy in Wahoo, Nebraska. Hill taught a wide variety of subject at the Academy, but history, the Swedish language and literature were his main subjects. After the President resigned, Hill agreed to take over the administration of the Academy as acting president, a position he held for 15 years Hill served the Luther Academy for 31 years.
In 1901, he traveled to Sweden and wrote a travel description entitled "Sverige resan," which was published in the Nebraska paper The Omaha Bee.
Hill was ordained in 1917, and upon his resignation from teaching he accepted a call from the Swedish Lutheran church in Colton, Oregon. During his years as a pastor, he also spent time writing poetry and contributing articles to the Swedish-American press. During World War I, he published a collection of poetry, Uggletoner i Vargatider (Portland, 1916.) He also served as contributing editor to the journal Ungdomsvännen.
Hill passed away on June 5, 1920 in Elgaros, Oregon.
For additional biographical information of S.M. Hill see: Korsbaneret, 1922 p. 235-240; Dowie, Iverne J., Prairie Grass Dividing.
Scope & Content The collection includes a scrapbook of Hill's travels, letters received by Hill, clippings of his writings, sermons, lectures, articles, a variety of songs and poems by Hill and other persons, and material from Hill's service as a Lutheran missionary in Salt Lake City.
The scrapbook of Hills's travel to Sweden in 1901 (missing pp. 28-62) contains photographs, letters from friends, misc. brochures and other memorabilia and Hill's own travel diary.
The letters Hill received are both professional and personal. For a period of time, he used the back side of letters received for his own poetry. Many of poems are also tributes to deceased friends, or memorials for special anniversary days and/or patriotic days.
Hill's sermons are both in English and Swedish and from the period of 1887-1918. The lectures are mostly on the topic of church history, education, but include also lectures on the topic of alcoholism and temperance from the period 1887-1890.
The articles and speeches are in both English and Swedish and on a wide variety of subjects, please see detailed folder inventory below. Included are also writings by other people.

The material from Hill's mission work in Salt Lake City includes speeches on the topic of Mormonism, letters from Swedish immigrants, and clippings.

The material contained in box 5 and 6 contain mostly family letters and photographs.

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